News RSS

Our ‘Struttgarter’ onions have an incredible shelf life! Not only are they deeply golden, with a tremendous flavor and oniony bite- they’re one of the longest keepers we’ve tried. Treat them right and you’ll have onions from harvest until April!Many onion varieties store quite well given the right conditions. Optimal onion storage can be achieved with just a few simple considerations.1. Preharvest dry down- Planning for onion storage begins at the end of the previous summer. Cut-off watering as soon as the outer four leaves begin to dry down after the onion has completed bulbing. Drying down starts at the...

Read more

10 Steps to Great GarlicFall is the time to plant garlic and shallots!Growing great garlic is a relatively simple, follow these few steps will have you turning out beautiful heads next summer!1.  Plant individual cloves with the root side down 2-3 inches deep and 12" apart September through November, depending on your climate.  Wait until after your first frost, but before the ground freezes.  It's a pretty forgiving time frame compared to other crops, but garlic that has had a little time to get roots growing will be more frost tolerant when it comes time for deep freezes.  Cloves planted...

Read more

Tomato Spotlight:  Old Fashioned "Green Shouldered" TomatoesGreen shoulders are typical of some progressively-ripening heirloom tomatoes.  This means there is a bit of green remaining near the stem end of the fruit even when the tomato is completely ripe.  Because chlorophyll is present in the fruit, photosynthesis is happening within the fruit right until its picked-  therefore enhancing flavor and nutrient profile of the ripe tomato. This trait has been bred out of many modern varieties, but the flavor of these outstanding heirlooms with their little green shoulders is unbeatable!Check out:  'Black Brandywine', 'Orange Brandywine', 'Mortgage Lifter', 'Pink Brandywine', 'Red Vernissage', and 'Green...

Read more

Earwigs, Dermaptera, are perhaps more well-known for their freakiness than for their capacity to be destructive in the garden- but trust me, they are both.  These lovers of water in the desert are common in dry climates where water is present- i.e. irrigated gardens and farms.  In fact, they look like miniature aquatic crawdads.  They are nocturnal so you may not even know you have them until you go out with your headlamp and see them feeding on tender corn silks, the leaves of young fruit trees, or zinnia leaves and petals.  Luckily the tell-tale signs of earwig damage are easy...

Read more

Listen to our recent interview on the Misfit Gardener Podcast! Connecting with Giving Ground Seeds

Read more