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Its the time of year that queen bumblebees are emerging from their over-wintering hiding places to find a spot to hatch the season's colony in.  Bumblebees are magical and important garden visitors.  We want to encourage them as much as we can to show up in our garden.  Providing nesting sites is one excellent way to do this.  For nesting sites they look for warm, dry, shoebox-sized cavities in the ground.  Old rodent nests or tunnels, tree hollows near the ground, or areas of grass that have grown dense and fallen over all make excellent natural sites for the bumblebee's nest.  If you...

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Native wildflowers like Bee Balm, Showy Milkweed, Blue Flax, Blanketflower, and Yarrow benefit from a period of cold stratification prior to planting.  Cold stratification is basically giving your seeds exposure to a false winter.  Most plants evolved away from accidentally germinating in the middle of the winter by requiring a certain number of days exposed to low temperatures before they will sprout.  Our vegetable crops don't require this period of cold simply because thousands of years of gardeners have bred this trait out of them!  But our native plants still like to know they've been through the worst of it...

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We are also so excited to finally be offering Showy Milkweed!Showy milkweed is a Western native wildflower famous for being the host plant of the monarch butterfly. Host plant simply means that monarch mamas lay their eggs on or near milkweed plants so that hatching caterpillars can feed on the milkweed leaves. Milkweed leaves are slightly toxic and impart this toxicity to the feasting caterpillars- giving them their primary defense mechanism. Milkweed flowers are stunningly beautiful and attract a wide variety of pollinators- not just monarchs.  Being a native wildflower it is drought tolerant and appropriate for dry gardens.  Contrary to what...

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Our ‘Struttgarter’ onions have an incredible shelf life! Not only are they deeply golden, with a tremendous flavor and oniony bite- they’re one of the longest keepers we’ve tried. Treat them right and you’ll have onions from harvest until April!Many onion varieties store quite well given the right conditions. Optimal onion storage can be achieved with just a few simple considerations.1. Preharvest dry down- Planning for onion storage begins at the end of the previous summer. Cut-off watering as soon as the outer four leaves begin to dry down after the onion has completed bulbing. Drying down starts at the...

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10 Steps to Great GarlicFall is the time to plant garlic and shallots!Growing great garlic is a relatively simple, follow these few steps will have you turning out beautiful heads next summer!1.  Plant individual cloves with the root side down 2-3 inches deep and 12" apart September through November, depending on your climate.  Wait until after your first frost, but before the ground freezes.  It's a pretty forgiving time frame compared to other crops, but garlic that has had a little time to get roots growing will be more frost tolerant when it comes time for deep freezes.  Cloves planted...

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